Why I Don't Subscribe To the Girlboss Mentality

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Photo by Emily Fata

It’s taken me a very long time in my freelance writing journey to consider myself “the boss”. However, at the end of the day, that’s exactly what I am and what I need to be in order to get things done. I have to be both the CEO and the employee—one guiding the other the do the work necessary to reach the end goal. The notion of being the boss in your small business was always somewhat of an afterthought for me, but with the rise of the Girlboss movement, it really made me think about how I want to approach my professional life.

I find that we are inundated with ideas of how you should be acting or thinking when it comes to being an entrepreneur, but none of them feel right for me. So I thought I would write a post about why I don’t subscribe to the Girlboss mentality in case anyone is feeling just as much uncertainty about it.

Everyone Works At Their Own Pace

The main thing I have trouble agreeing with is the notion that no matter who you are, you should be working the same amount of hours and at the same pace as all the other “girlbosses” out there to achieve success. It’s common knowledge now that people function at their own pace at that varies throughout the day. Some are early birds, others are night owls. That doesn’t make them any less efficient in the way they run their business and do their work.

Sure, some people thrive off of busy day-to-day lives where they are constantly in meetings or answering emails as soon as they wake up, but that’s not appropriate for everyone and I don’t think we should expect it to be. Some don’t want a six figure business, but rather one that provides all the necessities and then some extra spending money. No one business model is more valid than the other and we shouldn’t be treating these mentalities like they are either.

Mental Health Plays A Big Part In Motivation

One thing that I often find goes understated is the fact that those of us who suffer from mental health issues are pretty much left in the rubble if we can’t keep up with a fast-paced business life. Have we forgotten that mental health plays a huge part in how much work you can do every day, or is it something that capitalism wants us to ignore in order to be as profitable as possible? Some people can’t work 10 hour days every day and they shouldn’t be made to feel like less than because of it. Just because someone doesn’t look physically sick, doesn’t mean they can function at the same pace as someone who might be a self-proclaimed workaholic.

_______ Does Not Equal Success

That blank can be filled in with anything—a lot of money, a big house, a fast car, a lot of Instagram followers, etc. If your model of success is based on what has transfixed us for decades in the capitalist market, then I think you’re doing it wrong. While, it’s completely understandable to want to earn enough money to sustain yourself and your family, don’t think that you then need to buy into other status symbols of success to be considered valid. Some people have to work a full-time job in order to sustain their small business, and there’s absolutely wrong with that. They are just as much on the path of success as a billionaire sitting on a yacht. In my opinion, it’s all about gratitude and mindset—all the money in the world won’t make you feel proud of yourself if you aren’t staying true to you.

It’s Okay To Have Some Down Time

I get it—the more you work, the more likely it is to succeed. But I think it’s still okay to have some downtime when necessary without feeling guilty for the leisure. Girlboss mentality will have you believe that if you take a break or take your foot off the gas for a bit, then you are basically asking for failure. The idea that you always have to be working yourself to the bone to even be considered successful or valid is insane to me. Everyone needs a break to fell mentally and physically capable of reaching the goals they’ve set out for themselves. Working all day, every day, or waking up at 5 am does not prove anything about our work ethic, other than that you might be a masochist.